International Journal of Humanity and Social Sciences https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS <p>IJHSS is an open access journal that publishes peer-reviewed articles in humanities and social sciences. It aims to provide a platform for sharing insights, perspectives, and experiences on the issues and challenges facing humanity and society in the 21st century. The journal covers topics such as anthropology, sociology, psychology, education, culture, history, philosophy, religion, art, literature, media, communication, and more. The journal is indexed in several databases and follows strict ethical standards and quality principles. The journal publishes articles monthly and provides fast and efficient publication process. The authors receive certificates for publication and can access, read, download, cite, and order hardcopy prints of their articles. Publishing in IJHSS is beneficial for the authors because it offers them an opportunity to showcase their research to a wide and diverse audience.</p> en-US <p>Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License</a> that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgment of the work’s authorship and initial publication in this journal.</p> Fri, 29 Mar 2024 03:21:04 +0300 OJS 3.2.1.4 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Mental Health Stigma in Minority Communities: Understanding Cultural Perceptions and Access to Care https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1784 <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The general purpose of this study was to understand how cultural perceptions and beliefs about mental health in minority communities influence their access to mental health care services.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>The study adopted a desktop research methodology. Desk research refers to secondary data or that which can be collected without fieldwork. Desk research is basically involved in collecting data from existing resources hence it is often considered a low cost technique as compared to field research, as the main cost is involved in executive’s time, telephone charges and directories. Thus, the study relied on already published studies, reports and statistics. This secondary data was easily accessed through the online journals and library.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> The findings reveal that there exists a contextual and methodological gap relating to mental health stigma in minority communities. Preliminary empirical review revealed that cultural perceptions heavily influenced access to care. It emphasized the necessity of cultural competence in mental health advocacy and intervention, stressing the importance of engaging community leaders. The research identified significant barriers to care, including language barriers and distrust of mainstream healthcare systems. Recommendations included increasing diversity among mental health professionals and implementing policies to address disparities. Overall, the study highlighted the need for comprehensive, culturally sensitive approaches to destigmatize mental health and improve access to care in minority communities.</p> <p><strong>Unique Contribution to Theory, Practice and Policy: </strong>The Social Cognitive theory, Intersectionality theory and Cultural Adaptation theory may be used to anchor future studies on mental health stigma in minority communities. The study on "Mental Health Stigma in Minority Communities" offered recommendations that contributed significantly to theory, practice, and policy. It emphasized the importance of culturally sensitive interventions, community engagement, education, policy changes, research, and intersectionality in addressing mental health stigma. By advocating for tailored approaches, collaborative efforts, awareness-raising campaigns, systemic reforms, and inclusive strategies, the study aimed to reduce barriers to mental health care access and promote a more supportive environment for individuals within minority communities.</p> Ken Adams Copyright (c) 2024 Ken Adams http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1784 Fri, 29 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0300 The Effects of Economic Globalization on Indigenous Communities https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1782 <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The general purpose of this study was to look into the effects of economic globalization on indigenous communities.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>The study adopted a desktop research methodology. Desk research refers to secondary data or that which can be collected without fieldwork. Desk research is basically involved in collecting data from existing resources hence it is often considered a low cost technique as compared to field research, as the main cost is involved in executive’s time, telephone charges and directories. Thus, the study relied on already published studies, reports and statistics. This secondary data was easily accessed through the online journals and library.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> The findings reveal that there exists a contextual and methodological gap relating to economic globalization on indigenous communities. Preliminary empirical review revealed that economic globalization had diverse and often adverse impacts on indigenous livelihoods, cultures, and environments. It found that while some communities experienced short-term economic gains, many faced displacement, land dispossession, and environmental degradation. Additionally, the study highlighted the importance of recognizing and protecting indigenous rights, advocating for more inclusive and equitable development approaches. Collaboration between indigenous communities, governments, and civil society is crucial for addressing the challenges posed by economic globalization and promoting sustainable development that respects indigenous sovereignty and fosters social justice.</p> <p><strong>Unique Contribution to Theory, Practice and Policy: </strong>World-Systems theory, Cultural Hybridity theory and the Dependency theory may be used to anchor future studies on economic globalization on indigenous communities. The study offered valuable recommendations that contributed to theory, practice, and policy in addressing the challenges faced by indigenous peoples. By synthesizing existing theoretical frameworks and advocating for culturally sensitive development policies, the study provided a comprehensive approach to understanding and addressing the impacts of economic globalization on indigenous livelihoods, cultures, and environments. The recommendations emphasized the importance of integrating indigenous knowledge, strengthening legal frameworks for indigenous rights protection, and fostering collaborative partnerships among diverse stakeholders. Overall, the study's recommendations aimed to empower indigenous communities, promote social justice, and advance a vision of sustainable development that prioritizes indigenous well-being.</p> Felix Toti Copyright (c) 2024 Felix Toti http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1782 Fri, 29 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0300 The Role of Family Structure in Juvenile Delinquency https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1785 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The general purpose of the study was to explore the role of family structure and juvenile diplomacy.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>The study adopted a desktop research methodology. Desk research refers to secondary data or that which can be collected without fieldwork. Desk research is basically involved in collecting data from existing resources hence it is often considered a low cost technique as compared to field research, as the main cost is involved in executive’s time, telephone charges and directories. Thus, the study relied on already published studies, reports and statistics. This secondary data was easily accessed through the online journals and library.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> The findings reveal that there exists a contextual and methodological gap relating to family structure in juvenile diplomacy. Preliminary empirical review revealed that that family structure significantly influences adolescent engagement in delinquent behaviors, with adolescents from single-parent households or non-traditional family arrangements exhibiting higher rates of delinquency. Research highlighted the mediating role of factors such as parental supervision and positive peer relationships, along with cultural variations in this relationship. Qualitative insights underscored the unique challenges faced by adolescents from non-traditional family structures, emphasizing the importance of tailored support. Overall, the findings underscored the need for context-specific interventions and policies to address juvenile delinquency, informed by a comprehensive understanding of family dynamics and socio-cultural factors.</p> <p><strong>Unique Contribution to Theory, Practice and Policy: </strong>Social Learning theory, Strain theory and Social Control theory may be used to anchor future studies on the role of family structure in juvenile delinquency. The study provided recommendations with significant contributions to theory, practice, and policy. It advanced theoretical understanding by highlighting the complex interplay between family dynamics and delinquent behavior, contributing empirical support for existing theoretical models. The study recommended the development of family-centered interventions to strengthen parental supervision and support networks, promote positive peer relationships, and address systemic factors contributing to family stressors. Policy implications included initiatives to support family well-being, invest in evidence-based programs, and integrate findings into broader social policies. Collaboration across sectors was emphasized to implement comprehensive approaches, and the need for continued research to deepen understanding and inform targeted interventions was underscored.</p> Cole Peters Copyright (c) 2024 Cole Peters http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1785 Fri, 29 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0300 Cultural Influences on Parenting Styles and Child Development https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1783 <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The general aim of the study was to examine the cultural influences on parenting styles and child development.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>The study adopted a desktop research methodology. Desk research refers to secondary data or that which can be collected without fieldwork. Desk research is basically involved in collecting data from existing resources hence it is often considered a low cost technique as compared to field research, as the main cost is involved in executive’s time, telephone charges and directories. Thus, the study relied on already published studies, reports and statistics. This secondary data was easily accessed through the online journals and library.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> The findings reveal that there exists a contextual and methodological gap relating to cultural influences on parenting styles and child development. Preliminary empirical review revealed the significant role of cultural norms, values, and beliefs in shaping parenting behaviors and influencing child well-being across diverse cultural contexts. Through a comprehensive review of empirical research, it highlighted distinct patterns of parenting practices influenced by cultural factors such as collectivism, individualism, and religiosity. Findings also emphasized the dynamic nature of cultural adaptation within immigrant populations, with shifts in parenting styles observed as parents acculturated to the host society. The study underscored the importance of culturally sensitive interventions and support services in promoting positive parent-child relationships and enhancing child well-being across diverse cultural backgrounds.</p> <p><strong>Unique Contribution to Theory, Practice and Policy: </strong>The Social Learning theory, Ecological Systems theory and Attachment theory may be used to anchor future studies on cultural influences on parenting styles and child development. The study provided valuable recommendations across multiple domains. It advised researchers to further explore cultural influences on parenting within diverse contexts and integrate insights from various disciplines to enhance theoretical frameworks. Practitioners were encouraged to adopt culturally sensitive approaches, receive training in cultural competence, and collaborate with community stakeholders to support families effectively. Policymakers were urged to develop culturally responsive policies addressing systemic barriers faced by diverse families and promote inclusive practices in healthcare, education, and social services. Additionally, the study emphasized the importance of continued research, culturally tailored interventions, practitioner training, and collaborative efforts to promote positive parenting and child well-being across diverse cultural backgrounds.</p> Hendricks Masamba Copyright (c) 2024 Hendricks Masamba http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://carijournals.org/journals/index.php/IJHSS/article/view/1783 Fri, 29 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0300